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Our Broken World by Susan J. Reinhardt

Susan J. ReinhardtWhat if we no longer enjoyed the freedoms we’ve taken for granted?

That question followed on the heels of the experience I mentioned in my earlier interview. As I meditated on the voices of the forefathers fading like dying echoes, I considered what it might be like to live in an America that was no longer the home of the free and the brave.

Free speech, freedom of religion, the right to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness are aspects of life in America that we all hold dear. People will resist major changes, but the slow erosion of our rights can go almost unnoticed.

The story of a family, who experienced life unhindered by excessive control and now facing anti-Christian bigotry at its worst, flowed onto the page. Someone once said to me my story was too mild. Yet, I knew it would impact those of us accustomed to worshiping as we see fit, speaking our minds, and making decisions based on what was best for our families.

Recently, my mom’s baby sister, passed away at the age of 80. She’s with Jesus, and we know we’ll see her again. Death has a way of emphasizing that life is short – a mere blip in terms of eternity. I want my life to count for God’s Kingdom.

The Lord’s Prayer talks about, “Thy Kingdom come, Thy will be done on earth as it is in heaven.” This world is broken – not just our country. Jesus came to bring life and life more abundant. My desire is that my words would be containers of life, pointing the way to the Life Giver.

Will I always write stories like this? I don’t know, but I had to write this trilogy. Whatever the future holds, I know that my life is in God’s hands. We’re truly pilgrims passing through.

About the Author, Susan J. Reinhardt:

Susan J. Reinhardt’s publishing credits include her novels, The Moses Conspiracy, The Christmas Wish, and The Scent of Fear, as well as devotionals, short articles, and contributions to anthologies. She is a member of American Christian Fiction Writers.

A widow, daughter, stepmom, and active church member, Susan resides in Pennsylvania. When not writing, she enjoys time with family and friends, reading, couponing, gardening, and finding small treasures in antique shops.

You can meet up with Susan at her blog, Christian Writer/Reader Connection on FacebookGoodreads, and Twitter. Susan is also on Google+, LinkedIn, and Pinterest.

Susan’s other novels, The Christmas Wish and The Scent of Fear are also available.

More About The Moses Conspiracy:

In 2025, the Christian World is under attack!

Two seemingly unconnected events set in motion a diabolical plan. Ellie and John Zimmerman find themselves embroiled in a life-threatening investigation, fighting a shadowy enemy.

After a terrorist attack on Washington, D.C. in the near future, Ellie plans a trip with her young son, Peter, and they become separated. At the same time back home, John witnesses a buggy accident with unusual circumstances.

Caught between strained family relations and ominous warnings from a faceless enemy, the couple rely on God for wisdom and protection.

The truth of the past tragedy is revealed. While they may expose the culprits, will they survive the heartache it brings?

You can meet up with Susan at her blog, Christian Writer/Reader Connection on FacebookGoodreads, and Twitter. Susan is also on Google+, LinkedIn, and Pinterest.

Susan’s other novels, The Christmas Wish and The Scent of Fear are also available.

And be sure to meet, Susan’s heroine, Ellie Zimmerman, in her interview from Monday, and also check out Susan’s interview from Wednesday.

 

7 Comments Post a comment
  1. Thanks for having me on your blog this week, Fay. I pray I’ve given people something to consider and that they will take action as the Lord leads.

    June 6, 2014
  2. Susan has given us something to consider. I appreciate her insight! Thanks to both of you for an interesting and thought provoking series this week.

    June 6, 2014
    • Hi Karen –

      Thanks for stopping by and commenting. Fay asked some great questions, didn’t she?

      Blessings,
      Susan 🙂

      June 7, 2014
  3. It really is a blip, our years down here. I want my days to count.

    Thank you for that emphasis, Susan. And for hosting, Ms. Lamb.

    June 6, 2014
  4. Hi Rhonda –

    Thanks for commenting, Rhonda. My parents would always tell me the years go faster as you get older. It’s true.

    I often think about Methuseleh, who lived 969 years – the longest of any human being. Even his long life came to an end. Our years are much shorter. Let’s make the most of them.

    Blessings,
    Susan 🙂

    June 7, 2014
  5. Susan: You are so right. We live in a fallen world. I participate in a prayer ministry at our church. We recognize that our time is short here and that Jesus could come back at any time. We also recognize that our freedoms have been eroded. Thank you for putting into words what a lot of us know and might not always want to admit.

    June 7, 2014
    • Hi Cecelia –

      Thank you for your thoughtful comments. Knowing the problem is essential to fixing it. It isn’t pleasant to face these things, but ignoring them will create far greater consequences.

      Blessings,
      Susan 🙂

      June 7, 2014

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