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Faith Lessons from Father Mike by Sydney Avey

sydauthorphoto_smallI’ve always liked the idea of having a spiritual mentor, so I created Father Mike, an Anglican priest who gently guides my protagonist Dee into the discovery of faith. Much like Christ, who asks questions that reveal the hearts of those who come to him, Father Mike drills down to get to the heart of Dee’s anxiety. When Dee spills her antagonism toward her mother, Father Mike refocuses her on connections she is missing in her life that have nothing to do with her mother and everything to do with the choices she herself has made.

Anxiety is an expression of fear, a state of being the Bible warns us against repeatedly. Getting to the root of what you fear most in a situation and asking God the biggest question you can about that fear is an exercise in Hebrews 11:1 faith: “Now faith is being sure of what we hope for and certain of what we do not see.” (NIV)

As a debut author, I have much to fear. When I take it to its deepest level, I fear the demands of marketing my book will cause me to lose heart for writing. I experienced this knee-knocking fear in my first meet and greet at Barnes and Noble in Bakersfield, California.

Standing alone by the table where my books were stacked alongside a fresh supply of newly purchased Sharpies for signing, I pep-talked myself much the way a wallflower at the prom does: Don’t be shy. Be confident. Be approachable. Smile! Then I put Father Mike’s advice to work. I worked from my place of fear, that no one would buy my book, to my place of hope.

Surprisingly, it had nothing to do with book sales. My prayer was this: God, if this is no fun I am never going to want to do it again. Can you make it fun? And He did. He sent me an angel named Julia who came to my table, took over and made it a party (See the story, Signing Books at Barnes and Noble http://sydneyavey.com/2014/05/13/signing-books-barnes-noble/.

My biggest fear was not that I would fail to sell books but that I would fail to connect with readers. Julie facilitated that connection by drawing people to me and the conversations were exhilarating.

As I prayed, my certainty increased that once I got to the heart of the problem He would be there to walk with me. God ignored my initial pathetic fear-based mumblings: Dear God in Heaven, could you let me sell just ONE book? When I finally got to the heart of what I hoped for – connection – God said now you’re talking.

Life is messy. When I started out to write novels I was unaware what was ahead; a publishing industry in turmoil and pressure to turn art and craft into a business seemingly at odds with the faith walk I experience when I write. But God is in the business of helping us connect the dots so we can see the big picture.

Faith Questions

In The Wisdom of the Sheep Walker, a companion to my novel The Sheep Walker’s Daughter, Father Mike poses these questions to Dee, who does not know God at the beginning of the book.

  1. Assume there is a God. What is the one question you would like to ask Him?
  2. Ask questions. Expect answers. Pay attention to what people say; and what they don’t say.
  3. This is what faith is, being sure of what you hope for, even though you don’t see it. What is your biggest hope?
  4. Assume there is a God. Ask Him to bless you. Ask Jesus to guide you. Ask the Holy Spirit to empower you. Watch what happens.
  5. The doors to our hearts can malfunction. Our Lord opens doors to understanding, but only if we keep the hinges properly maintained. Our faith hinges on knowing what we hope for and believing it is there for us.
  6. Keep asking the big questions. Keep seeking truth in your art and your life. Keep knocking on the door.

Confess your fears, but ask God for your biggest hope. I love the New Living Translation of Luke 11:9. “And so I tell you, keep on asking, and you will receive what you ask for. Keep on seeking, and you will find. Keep on knocking, and the door will be opened to you.”  Only believe.

The Wisdom of the Sheep Walker is available on Amazon.com.

bookcoverMore About The Sheep Walker’s Daughter:

Delores “Dee” Moraga Carter, a Korean War widow’s difficult mother dies before revealing the identity of Dee’s father. As Dee sorts through what little her mother left, she unearths puzzling clues that raise more questions: Why did Leora send money every month to the Basque Relief Agency? Why is Dee’s own daughter so secretive about her soon-to-be published book? And what does an Anglican priest know that he isn’t telling? The Sheep Walker’s Daughter pairs a colorful immigrant history of loss, survival, and tough choices with one woman’s search for spiritual identity and personal fulfillment.

The Sheep Walker’s Daughter is available in print, eBook, and audio.

About Sydney Avey:

Sydney Avey lives in the Sierra Nevada foothills of Yosemite, California, and the Sonoran Desert in Arizona. She has a bachelor’s degree in English from the University of California, Berkeley, and a lifetime of experience writing news for non profits and corporations. Her work has appeared in Epiphany, Foliate Oak, Forge, American Athenaeum, and Unstrung (published by Blue Guitar Magazine). She has studied at the Iowa Summer Writing Festival. Sydney blogs  on topics related to relationships, legacy, faith, and the writing life at sydneyavey.com.

You can also discover more about Sydney via her e-mail (sydneyavey@gmail.com), her website, on FacebookTwitterLinkedIn and Pinterest.

Be sure to check on Monday’s interview with Delores Moraga Carter and Wednesday’s interview with Delores’ author, Sydney Avey.

This week on Inner Source has belonged to Sydney. Be sure to check out each of the posts this week and leave a comment for a chance to win a copy of The Sheep Walker’s Daughter. One lucky reader will be able to choose the book format they prefer.

Author Interview: Sydney Avey

sydauthorphoto_smallToday’s guest is Sydney Avey the author of The Sheep Walker’s Daughter. Sydney lives in the Sierra Nevada foothills of Yosemite, California, and the Sonoran Desert in Arizona. She has a bachelor’s degree in English from the University of California, Berkeley, and a lifetime of experience writing news for non profits and corporations. Her work has appeared in Epiphany, Foliate Oak, Forge, American Athenaeum, and Unstrung (published by Blue Guitar Magazine). She has studied at the Iowa Summer Writing Festival. Sydney blogs  on topics related to relationships, legacy, faith, and the writing life at sydneyavey.com.

You can also discover more about Sydney via her e-mail (sydneyavey@gmail.com), her website, on FacebookTwitterLinkedIn and Pinterest.

Sydney, thank you for joining us on Inner Source. When I read The Sheep Walker’s Daughter it was obvious to me that this 1950’s era historical is literary in nature and with the back ground of one of the characters, I realized that you must have an educational background. Would you care to share a little about yourself with our readers?

It’s true, Fay. I love literary fiction. I was an English major at U.C. Berkeley. I also love a page turner, a story that surprises me and makes me think. After I wound up my marketing communications career at Hewlett-Packard Co. and was finally free to pursue my creative writing passion, I thought long and hard about how to tell the stories I wanted to tell. I wanted to write for people who don’t usually read Christian Fiction, because it isn’t what I read. I wanted to get my fingers into the true nature of my characters without having to dress them up for church. And I wanted to present faith to as an organic part of my story, not as a sermon or an add-on.

I thought I would have to disguise my literary style in a genre if I wanted to sell it. Historical fiction seemed the most hospitable. I think change is in the wind on the division between literary and genre writing. Donald Maass has written a book, Writing 21st Century Fiction: High Impact Techniques for Exceptional Storytelling, in which he sees the lines between plot and character driven novels blurring. He puts a call out for great stories told with beautiful writing. He’s setting the bar high!

I’ll just put it out there. To have an impact, sometimes you have to risk offending people. I want my readers to see people they know in my characters—grandma who likes her martini, Uncle John who can get positively poetic when a fish slips off his hook, the people who shock us and help us become who we are, good, bad, but mostly a mixed bag.

I enjoy novels that educate me on unfamiliar history and culture. The Basque culture is well portrayed in The Sheep Walker’s Daughter. Does your knowledge of this culture comes from your personal background or from a study of the culture?

I have not one drop of Basque blood in my veins, and I’ve never known a Basque. Like Dee, I was unaware of my true ethnic and cultural background until my mother revealed our heritage shortly before she died. My grandfather was a Jew who escaped from a pogrom in Poland. I decided not to use my own story because there is so much baggage attached to it I chose the Basques because I have visited Barcelona, which is close to the Basque country and has some historical and geographical similarities. And because few people know the history of the Basques, myself included. I was curious.

When I discovered through research that there was a large Basque population in Bakersfield I got excited over the opportunity to do original research.  I’ve eaten in the restaurants I refer to in the book and sat at the table with sheepherders who told me stories of their lives in the early twentieth century.

In The Sheep Walker’s Daughter you tell the story of four unique women from three generations of a family. The oldest generation is a mother who made a significant choice of career over family. My heart ached for her two daughters, and you bring the emotions to the surface in a way in which I can relate. Is this something with which you have had firsthand experience or did you draw from other personal relationships to make these characters so multi-dimensional?

You ask great questions! My own family history is just as dramatic as Dee’s story, which is entirely fiction. That said, Leora is modeled after my great grandmother, whose story is legend in my family. She did leave a husband for a professional career. She left her son to be raised by her ex-husband and she took her two daughters. One died and one, my grandmother, was raised in hotels and left her mother at age 16 to go on the stage. Later, my great grandmother, grandmother and mother lived together in the very house on Lundy Lane in Los Altos that I described in the book. Creating multi-dimensional characters was not a stretch for me!

What is the main message that you would like your readers to take away from this story?

Ask God your big questions. Watch for the answers. I believe that God is the greatest storyteller of all. Life is a mystery that God wants us to solve and enjoy.

Do you have any future projects in the works? If so, please let us know what we can look forward to reading in the future.

The sequel, The Lyre and The Lambs, will be out September 3, 2014. Set in the 1960s, lonely Dee will be positively overwhelmed with family! Mother and daughter, both newlyweds, decide to set up housekeeping together. Dee and Valerie move with their husbands into a modern glass house in a traditional neighborhood. When their relatives start showing up and moving in, the neighbors get suspicious. Then a body is found in the backyard and the life they are trying to build comes undone. This book explores the passions that draw people together and the faith it takes to overcome trauma.

I hope you’ll come and bring one of your characters from The Lyre and the Lambs when the story is released, and thank you for sharing this unique story with me—and with our readers.

bookcoverMore About The Sheep Walker’s Daughter:

Delores “Dee” Moraga Carter, a Korean War widow’s difficult mother dies before revealing the identity of Dee’s father. As Dee sorts through what little her mother left, she unearths puzzling clues that raise more questions: Why did Leora send money every month to the Basque Relief Agency? Why is Dee’s own daughter so secretive about her soon-to-be published book? And what does an Anglican priest know that he isn’t telling? The Sheep Walker’s Daughter pairs a colorful immigrant history of loss, survival, and tough choices with one woman’s search for spiritual identity and personal fulfillment.

Be sure to check out Inner Sources interview with Sydney’s heroine, Delores Moraga Carter and check in again on Friday. This week Inner Source belongs to Sydney. Be sure to check out each of the posts this week and leave a comment for a chance to win a copy of The Sheep Walker’s Daughter. One lucky reader will be able to choose the book format they prefer.

Character Interview: Delores Moraga Carter from The Sheep Walker’s Daughter by Sydney Avey

bookcoverToday’s special guest is Delores Moraga Carter, the heroine from Sydney Avey’s The Sheep Walker’s Daughter.  Delores, welcome to Inner Source. I’ve read your story, and I realize that you are a private individual. I hope you don’t mind sharing with your readers because I found your story very interesting. First of all, please tell our readers a little bit about your life.

It is really hard for me to talk about myself. I was raised as an only child by a mother who did not talk to me very much. She never told me who my father was or where he came from. I always had the sense that something big was missing from my life. Turned out I was right about that!

My mother worked at a job she loved. She didn’t have a lot of time for me. I married young, raised a daughter, became a widow, and then my mother died. Like my mother, I had a career in a day and age when most women didn’t work. It’s funny, after all these years I still talk about myself mainly in relation to my mother. It was her death that brought Father Mike into my life. He brought me out of a dark time and helped me open my heart to love, to the truth that had been hidden from me, and to a whole new future.

I think I connect with you so well because we both have had what I call “mother” issues, and we are both overcoming those issues with prayer and by leaning upon God for our understanding. I understood you so well throughout the story. Is there a scripture that you lean upon when you are in danger of dwelling on the past issues rather than celebrating the good things about your mother?

Oh, so many scriptures; I have the same judgmental spirit my mother did. I have to constantly be in touch with my heart to root out bitterness. One of my favorite verses is Proverbs 3:5-6, Trust in the Lord with all your heart, and do not lean on your own understanding. In all your ways acknowledge him, and he will make straight your paths.” Spending my time trying to understand why my mother did hurtful things was my attempt to lean on my own understanding. When I began to focus on the qualities I inherited from my that equipped me to make my way in the world old hurts weren’t so important. I’ve come to understand that she did the best she could. She was hurt too, and in need of love that I couldn’t give her when she was alive. But like Father Mike says, it’s never too late to love. That brings me such peace.

To that, Delores, I say, “Amen.” That is exactly what I learned. I didn’t like my mother very much until I focused on all that she sacrificed for me, and now I love and respect her dearly.

You have a very rich heritage when you look at your family background, but you also have a heritage that your mother left to you that has nothing to do with the culture. What would you say is one of the most important things you inherited from your mother? How about from your father, even though you never met him?

Oh I’d have to say my spirit of independence. It has a downside. It took me a long time to learn to depend on God for direction. But it gave me the strength and courage to raise a daughter while my husband served his country and leave a safe job to pursue the talent God gave me. While I don’t agree with the decisions my mother made to split up our family, I do admire her for the work she did and the way she conducted herself in a man’s world. It’s just unfortunate that she felt she had to make the choices she did to build the life she wanted. I often wonder how things would have turned out if she had come to faith earlier.

Even though I never knew my father, my yearning for roots probably comes from him. Leora embraced rootlessness, but I never could. Apparently he found passion and purpose in the landscape that sustained his family for generations. My collages have always been my attempt to make sense of the past. That is probably something I inherit from my father, an orientation to the past. My daughter Valerie is more like her grandmother was, oriented toward the future.

The era and setting of 1950’s California, has to be years away from what it is today. Your daughter is highly educated, and the turbulent Sixties are right around the corner. We have gone through many changes in the time between the ’50s and today. What would you say is most changed in that span of time?

The Fifties were a time of hope and prosperity, but the Sixties brought an end to an age when our children felt safe and trusting. Now we’ve been through Vietnam, Iran, Iraq, Afghanistan, unwinnable wars in an increasingly global economy where our fortunes are tied with cultures we don’t understand. I guess I’d have to say that technology has given us access to information, but information isn’t knowledge and doesn’t lead to wisdom. Technology and communication have given us scientific and medical discoveries that have improved our lives in some areas but there seems to be more confusion over our common purpose than ever before.

Romans 8:28 says, “And we know that all things work together for good to them that love God, to them who are the called according to his purpose.” When God says, “all things” I believe He means even the bad things that happen to us. Your mother made decisions that affected your life. Looking back, do you see the good that God brought to your life, though her decisions may or may not have been the right ones to make?

You know, Father Mike knew a lot of my story, but he didn’t tell me. Instead, he helped me form the questions I needed to ask to get at the truth I needed to know.  By doing that, he showed me how to trust God for answers to more important questions about identity, connections, love and forgiveness. I wanted to know why my mother kept secrets. Once I experienced love and purpose in life, the secrets mattered less. I came to understand that she had her reasons to keep the secrets that belonged to her, but that God could restore lost relationships in ways I could not imagine. I can’t blame my mother for choices I made to continue a generational pattern that isolated me. I can only thank God for the people He brought into my life, especially Father Mike who encouraged me to open my heart.

Thank you, Delores. I know how hard it is for you to step out of your comfort zone and share with us, but I do believe that our readers will find your story exceptional.

More About The Sheep Walker’s Daughter:

Delores “Dee” Moraga Carter, a Korean War widow’s difficult mother dies before revealing the identity of Dee’s father. As Dee sorts through what little her mother left, she unearths puzzling clues that raise more questions: Why did Leora send money every month to the Basque Relief Agency? Why is Dee’s own daughter so secretive about her soon-to-be published book? And what does an Anglican priest know that he isn’t telling? The Sheep Walker’s Daughter pairs a colorful immigrant history of loss, survival, and tough choices with one woman’s search for spiritual identity and personal fulfillment.

The Sheep Walker’s Daughter is available in print, eBook, and audio.

sydauthorphoto_smallAbout Sydney Avey:

Sydney Avey lives in the Sierra Nevada foothills of Yosemite, California, and the Sonoran Desert in Arizona. She has a bachelor’s degree in English from the University of California, Berkeley, and a lifetime of experience writing news for non profits and corporations. Her work has appeared in Epiphany, Foliate Oak, Forge, American Athenaeum, and Unstrung (published by Blue Guitar Magazine). She has studied at the Iowa Summer Writing Festival. Sydney blogs  on topics related to relationships, legacy, faith, and the writing life at sydneyavey.com.

You can also discover more about Sydney via her e-mail (sydneyavey@gmail.com), her website, on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and Pinterest.

This week Inner Source belongs to Sydney. Be sure to check in on Wednesday and Friday, and leave a comment each day for your chance to win a copy of The Sheep Walker’s Daughter. The lucky reader will be able to choose the book format they prefer.

Depending Upon God by Carole Towriss

Carole TowrissI write Biblical fiction novels. Since I’m telling a Bible story, the basic plot is generally laid out for me. I can’t veer from the tale the Scriptures tell.

But unlike some authors, I don’t like to write about the big names—David, Esther, Abraham. I like to write about little-known characters in the well-known stories. These people are mentioned only a few times, so I get to create a whole life for them. I usually have great leeway, and it’s a lot of fun for an author. But though the action plot is clear at the outset, the character’s journeys are not always settled until I am almost finished.

The main idea, or lesson, often becomes clear as I write as well. In By the Waters of Kadesh, the theme of depending on God, and not on the people around you, revealed itself as the story unfolded. Kamose was the ultimate soldier, used to commanding any situation, knowing exactly what needed to be done, then doing it perfectly. Then he lost his country, his career, his king, his purpose, his gods. He learned to look to Yahweh to rescue him when he could not rescue himself.

Tirzah, my heroine, did not have people in her life whom she could trust. She believed she was the only one she could count on to care for herself and her girls. When she met Kamose, she found a hero for the first time, but then he was taken from her as well. She learned to rely on Yahweh alone, and not on her husband, herself or her friends.

I think women especially can fall into the trap of depending on the men in their lives to meet all their needs. I know in the early days of my marriage, I did that to an almost dangerous extent. My father was an alcoholic, and my childhood was chaotic. A Christian husband—and household—was, in my eyes, a way out of the muck and mire of my past. If I married properly, horrible things like that would never happen to me.

My husband traveled a great deal for his job, being gone up to six weeks at a time, and I could fall into a depression during his absences. When he was home, I wanted everything to be perfect, and of course, it wasn’t. I wanted his undivided attention, which of course I didn’t get. The fact that it took us eight years to get pregnant only made things worse.

Counseling and maturity helped, but the real answer was realizing that a human can never meet the needs that only God can meet. God has created us to need Him, and we will never be whole, happy or at peace without Him.

God gave us people for us to love, and to love us. But they were never meant to take His place. No matter how much they love you, how much they care, how much they want to, they can never meet all your needs.

They are not supposed to. That’s God’s job.

About the Author:

Carole Towriss grew up in beautiful San Diego, California. Now she and her husband live just north of Washington, DC. In between making tacos and telling her four children to pick up their shoes for the third time, she reads, watches chick flicks, writes, and waits for summertime to return to the beach. You can find her at www.CaroleTowriss.com.

By the waters of KadeshMore About By the Waters of Kadesh:

Kamose, once Egypt’s most trusted soldier, no longer has a country to serve or king to protect. Moses insists God has a plan for him, but Kamose is not so sure. Tirzah’s cruel husband died shortly after they left Egypt. She escaped his brutality, but now she’s alone, and once they reach their new land, how will she survive? Gaddiel, Tirzah’s brother-in-law, is chosen as one of the twelve spies sent to scout out Canaan. He’s supposed to go in, get information and come back, but all he really wants is to bring down Joshua.

In the Shadow of SinaiAbout In the Shadow of Sinai:

An artisan’s world has been destroyed one too many times. Can he conquer his anger to see his ability for what is—a gift from El Shaddai? Or will he let his resentment rob him of his chance to build a masterpiece?

Bezalel is a Hebrew slave to Ramses II. An artisan of the highest order, Ramses has kept him in the palace even when all other Israelites have been banned. Bezalel blames El Shaddai for isolating him from his people.

When Moses and Aaron appear one summer, and El Shaddai shakes Egypt to its core, Bezalel must reexamine his anger. Over the course of the next year, Bezalel’s life becomes intertwined with those of an Egyptian child-slave, the captain of the guard, and especially a beautiful, young concubine.

When spring arrives, all of them escape with the young nation of Israel. But that’s only the beginning…

You can purchase By the Waters of Kadesh and In the Shadow of Sinai at Amazon.com and Barnes & Noble. Carole will be happy to autograph your copies if you wish to purchase them at her website.

Meet Carole and her heroine, Tirzah from By the Waters of Kadesh.

Author Interview: Carole Towriss

Carole Towriss

Carole Towriss is our guest today on Inner Source. 

Carole, thank you for being with us at Inner Source today. I truly enjoyed your story of Tirzah and Kamose. Will you give us a little background? I’m especially interested in hearing what led you to write this story.

This is a sequel to In the Shadow of Sinai, my story of the Exodus told from the point of view of the artisan who built the Ark of the Covenant. Kadesh follows the journey of the twelve spies who are sent into Canaan by Moses, as well as those waiting for their report.

Tirzah and Kamose are unique characters in the story. Would you mind sharing a little about how they developed in your imagination and came to life on the page?

Kamose was in Sinai, and is an Egyptian army officer who escaped with the Israelites. Scripture tells us many others, “a mixed multitude,” went with the Hebrews, and I thought it would be interesting to explore that. Originally he was going to die in Egypt, but my critique partners loved his character so much they kept sending my chapters back saying, “I hope you save him!” So I did, and now he has his own book.

Tirzah is a young widow whose husband dies (off-screen) in the battle of the golden calf.

I usually talk about the issues here, but I was most fascinated by your plot. Because this is Biblical fiction, and we must stay close to the Scripture, history, and the laws and traditions governing those times, your development of this plot must have taken quite a bit of extraordinary thought—which paid off by the way. Please tell us about the hero and heroine background and how you found a way for an Egyptian and an Israelite to marry.

Tirzah is a widow, who was married to a cruel and uncaring man. She was left with two young girls to care for in the wilderness, and as long as manna was appearing every day that was no problem. But in Canaan that was not going to work. I researched the Levirate marriage extensively, which was difficult because it’s hard to tell what is actually in Scriptures and what the Jewish teachers have added as the centuries have gone by. The purpose is actually quite noble and good – it assures the woman will have children to care for her in her old age, and the male will have his name continued. Most importantly, in Israel, it assured the land remained in the family. In a culture where the land in everything, and marriage is not always for love, it makes very good sense. In my book, Kamose worshipped Yahweh, and that is what allowed them to marry.

Gaddiel was also a historical Biblical figure in that he was one of the ten spies that stood against Jacob and Caleb—well, really against God. I especially loved the motivation you gave to him because I feel that his downfall was also Satan’s. Would you mind sharing with us how you came up with this particular issue for Gaddiel?

I wanted to know why someone –ten someones, really – would say the land cannot be conquered when God had repeatedly promised He would give it to them. What would cause that? I thought it had to be more than just fear. With twelve men, fear can usually be overcome. There had to be some other factor.

Are you currently working on any future projects? If so, please share them with us.

I’ve just finished the third of the trilogy, which takes place forty years later and is based on Numbers 21:1-3.

“When the Canaanite king of Arad, who lived in the Negev, heard that Israel was coming along the road to Atharim, he attacked the Israelites and captured some of them. Then Israel made this vow to the Lord: “If you will deliver these people into our hands, we will totally destroy their cities.” The Lord listened to Israel’s plea and gave the Canaanites over to them. They completely destroyed them and their towns; so the place was named Hormah.”

You’ll see a few of the same characters, although most of them have dies in the wilderness due to Yahweh’s decree.

Carole, your Biblical fiction is excellent. I read some of your work prior to publication, and I loved the time period in which your stories are set. Thank you so much for sharing with us today.

More About the Author Carole Towriss:

Carole Towriss grew up in beautiful San Diego, California. Now she and her husband live just north of Washington, DC. In between making tacos and telling her four children to pick up their shoes for the third time, she reads, watches chick flicks, writes, and waits for summertime to return to the beach. You can find her at www.CaroleTowriss.com.

By the waters of KadeshMore About By the Waters of Kadesh:

Kamose, once Egypt’s most trusted soldier, no longer has a country to serve or king to protect. Moses insists God has a plan for him, but Kamose is not so sure. Tirzah’s cruel husband died shortly after they left Egypt. She escaped his brutality, but now she’s alone, and once they reach their new land, how will she survive? Gaddiel, Tirzah’s brother-in-law, is chosen as one of the twelve spies sent to scout out Canaan. He’s supposed to go in, get information and come back, but all he really wants is to bring down Joshua.

In the Shadow of SinaiAbout In the Shadow of Sinai:

An artisan’s world has been destroyed one too many times. Can he conquer his anger to see his ability for what is—a gift from El Shaddai? Or will he let his resentment rob him of his chance to build a masterpiece?

Bezalel is a Hebrew slave to Ramses II. An artisan of the highest order, Ramses has kept him in the palace even when all other Israelites have been banned. Bezalel blames El Shaddai for isolating him from his people.

When Moses and Aaron appear one summer, and El Shaddai shakes Egypt to its core, Bezalel must reexamine his anger. Over the course of the next year, Bezalel’s life becomes intertwined with those of an Egyptian child-slave, the captain of the guard, and especially a beautiful, young concubine.

When spring arrives, all of them escape with the young nation of Israel. But that’s only the beginning…

You can purchase By the Waters of Kadesh and In the Shadow of Sinai at Amazon.com and Barnes & Noble. Carole will be happy to autograph your copies if you wish to purchase them at her website.

 

Character Interview: Tirzah from Carole Towriss’s By the Waters of Kadesh

By the waters of KadeshToday’s special guest is Tirzah, the heroine from Carole Towriss’s By the Waters of Kadesh, a biblical historical fiction.

Tirzah, please tell us a little about yourself.

I am a widow, and I have two little girls who are the light of my life. They are the reason I get up every morning. It’s hard out here in the wilderness. My brother-in-law inherited all of my husband’s property, and left me only our donkey and one sheep. He doesn’t help when the cloud says it’s time to move.

You experienced the miracles of God, which brought Israel out of slavery in Egypt. Would you mind telling us a little about your life in Egypt before the exodus?

My husband made bricks, like all the men. He … wasn’t very nice. I’ll just leave it at that. I stayed home with my girls like all the women. My parents were both gone and my siblings were all married and had moved on.

As long as you obeyed, life wasn’t too awfully bad. We just had no choices about … anything, really. Our men worked long hours and often died young.

What about the flight from the Pharaoh and the miracles you experienced when God delivered Israel out of Pharaoh’s hands? I’d love to hear a first-hand account.

Those were quite frightening! The first three plagues—the blood, the frogs and the gnats—we suffered as well as the Egyptians, but then for us life went on pretty much as before. At least it did until Egypt started falling apart. Eventually our men didn’t even have to show up for work because there were no foremen to supervise them.

The crossing was the most exciting, and terrifying. I crossed alone, with my girls, and they couldn’t move very fast. If it weren’t for Benjamin, our donkey, I’m not sure we would have made it at all.

When we neared the end, the Egyptians began to give chase, and the walls of water started to shudder. Those already across shouted for Yahweh to collapse the water onto even the Israelites still walking! But just as the last Benjamite stepped foot on shore, He brought the walls crashing onto the army. We were free! But I saw some of the soldiers as they watched the water topple onto them. It was horrifying. I have often wondered about the women they left behind…

Tirzah, you are a very gracious woman who cares for others when they seemingly do not care for you. How is it that you can do that?

I just think about what I needed when I was in a similar situation. Revenge doesn’t really accomplish very much. Bitterness only makes for more bitterness.

Your generation is one that will not see the Promised Land, but your children and children’s children will pass over into that land after your death. What is it that you hope for them when they finally come into that promise?

I hope they have peaceful, happy lives, like probably every mother wants. I hope they have husbands who love them and many healthy children and good friends who support them in times of need, like I did. And I hope they learn that even without those things, Yahweh is always enough.

Romans 8:28 says, “And we know that all things work together for good to them that love God, to them who are the called according to his purpose.” When God says, “all things” I believe He means even the bad things that happen to us. Did you discover this on your journey, and if so, how?

I learned through the bad things, as you call them, that when I think I have nothing, I have Yahweh, and His love for me is all I need. He gives me other things, other people, but those are gifts He gives me, sometimes only for a time. I cannot depend on those, but I can only depend on His presence in my life. He will always find a way to guide me through whatever is happening to me.

Is there scripture or a biblical concept that you lean upon to help you through your crisis?

Moses told us at out wedding, “If you say, ‘The Lord is my refuge,’ and you make the Most High your dwelling, no harm will overtake you, no disaster will come near your tent. ‘Because he loves me,’ says the Lord, ‘I will rescue him; I will protect him, for he acknowledges my name. He will call on me, and I will answer him; I will be with him in trouble.’”

Now, great physical harm came to my husband, but the harm did not overtake him. Yahweh rescued him and brought him back to me. There is nothing that can happen now, that I know Yahweh cannot bring us through.

More About By the Waters of Kadesh:

Kamose, once Egypt’s most trusted soldier, no longer has a country to serve or king to protect. Moses insists God has a plan for him, but Kamose is not so sure. Tirzah’s cruel husband died shortly after they left Egypt. She escaped his brutality, but now she’s alone, and once they reach their new land, how will she survive? Gaddiel, Tirzah’s brother-in-law, is chosen as one of the twelve spies sent to scout out Canaan. He’s supposed to go in, get information and come back, but all he really wants is to bring down Joshua.

In the Shadow of SinaiAbout In the Shadow of Sinai:

An artisan’s world has been destroyed one too many times. Can he conquer his anger to see his ability for what is—a gift from El Shaddai? Or will he let his resentment rob him of his chance to build a masterpiece?

Bezalel is a Hebrew slave to Ramses II. An artisan of the highest order, Ramses has kept him in the palace even when all other Israelites have been banned. Bezalel blames El Shaddai for isolating him from his people.

When Moses and Aaron appear one summer, and El Shaddai shakes Egypt to its core, Bezalel must reexamine his anger. Over the course of the next year, Bezalel’s life becomes intertwined with those of an Egyptian child-slave, the captain of the guard, and especially a beautiful, young concubine.

When spring arrives, all of them escape with the young nation of Israel. But that’s only the beginning…

You can purchase By the Waters of Kadesh and In the Shadow of Sinai at Amazon.com and Barnes & Noble. Carole will be happy to autograph your copies if you wish to purchase them at her website.

Carole TowrissAbout the Author:

Carole Towriss grew up in beautiful San Diego, California. Now she and her husband live just north of Washington, DC. In between making tacos and telling her four children to pick up their shoes for the third time, she reads, watches chick flicks, writes, and waits for summertime to return to the beach. You can find her at www.CaroleTowriss.com.

ARE YOU READY TO WEAR FUNERAL CLOTHES? by Christine Lindsay

Sarah  Lana as bookendsFor a Christian, writing novels can be like teaching Sunday school—the writer or teacher always learns more than the reader or student.

What I learned while writing Captured by Moonlight is that in order to fully enjoy the plans God has for us, we need to first go through a sort of funeral.

I can hear the gasps. Please let’s not talk about funerals. Especially if you like to read romance novels. Let’s talk weddings instead, which are so much nicer. Here in the west our brides wear white, while in the east they wear other colors to show their joy, usually red. The color white in eastern cultures is for wearing to funerals.

Yet, people around the globe want the same thing—to experience the joy that weddings bring.

As a Christian, I’m looking forward to when Christ calls His followers home and we have that grand wedding celebration when the Son of God claims His bride, the church. That’s the happy ending to our story as Christians.

But in order to fully enjoy that wedding—that kind of joy—we need a funeral first.

I hear more gasps.

I hear the rumblings of voices that sound so much like the things I say. “But I want my plans. I want my agenda. I’m afraid that God will make me do something that I will really hate. And oh no…what if He wants me to suffer for a while?”

Do you ever have feelings like this?

I admit I do.

Can I really trust God with my life, knowing that there will be suffering? Death?

Oswald Chambers in the devotional book My Utmost for His Highest explains that as Christians we must have a sort of funeral for our life, our ambitions, our plans. We must wear the metaphoric funeral garments. Once our life is dead and buried, we can allow Christ to live His life through us. But can we trust God to give us joy when we give up our dreams, and say “Thy Will be Done?”

In my novel Captured by Moonlight my character Eshana has to do just that. Eshana used to be a former Hindu widow, who to please the Hindu caste system she must dress in course white cotton of her culture, shave her head, and had no joy in her life. She must remain out of sight so that her presence doesn’t pollute someone else. Living like a Hindu widow is like living in a continual funeral…a funeral for yourself.

As the books begins Eshana has been a Christian for about ten years. She no longer lives as a Hindu widow, but is passionate about following in the steps of her mentor. Eshana wants nothing more than to administer the Christian mission that her mentor began. And she loves to wear bright colors that express her joy as a follower of Christ.

But as the story progresses, Eshana is kidnapped by her fanatical uncle who is angry that she is living like a Christian. He imprisons Eshana and forces her to wear the course white garments of a widow, and to live that deathlike existence.

Eshana despairs. How could her Lord Jesus let this happen to her? All she wanted to do was serve Christ by administering the mission. Now her Lord and Master has allowed her to be dressed in funeral clothes once more.

Eshana asks in this book, the same thing that I have asked. What if the Lord asks me to give up the work that I really love, like my writing career, and do something else?

You might ask, “What if He wants to send me to the mission field or a life of singleness?”

What I’ve been learning—and sometimes the hard way—is that we can trust God’s plans. He will use our lives for His glory in more marvelous ways than anything we could ever devise. Even if it hurts for a while. Even if we have to put our preferred work on the shelf to obey the Lord’s schedule for our day.

You might be surprised after your funeral what God will do in your life. You may find to your surprise that dying to your dreams may eventually become a dream-come-true.

Romans 6:4 “Buried with Him…that…even so we also should walk in newness of live.”

Christine Lindsay Author picAbout Christine Lindsay:

Christine Lindsay was born in Ireland, and is proud of the fact that she was once patted on the head by Prince Philip when she was a baby. Her great grandfather, and her grandfather—yes father and son—were both riveters on the building of the Titanic. Tongue in cheek, Christine states that as a family they accept no responsibility for the sinking of that great ship.

It was stories of her ancestors who served in the British Cavalry in Colonial India that inspired her multi-award-winning, historical series Twilight of the British Raj. Book 1 Shadowed in Silk, Book 2 Captured by Moonlight, and Christine is currently writing the final installment of that series called Veiled at Midnight to be released August 2014.

Londonderry Dreaming, Christine’s romance novella set in N. Ireland released in Feb. 2014.

Aside from being a busy writer and speaker, Christine is also VP of Christian Authors’ Network.

She makes her home in British Columbia, on the west coast of Canada with her husband and their grown up family. Her cat Scottie is chief editor on all Christine’s books. 

She makes her home in British Columbia, on the west coast of Canada with her husband and their grown up family. Her cat Scottie is chief editor on all Christine’s books.

Readers can connect with Christine by dropping by her website http://www.christinelindsay.com/ or follow her on Twitter and be her friend on Pinterest , Facebook  and  Goodreads.

CAPTURED BY MOONLIGHT—by Christine Lindsay Finalist in Readers’ Favorite 2013 Christian Historical, currently a finalist for the 2013 Grace Award and The Word Guild Award. (Best book 2013 according to Author April Gardner. Top ten of Diana Flowers 2013 picks.

Prisoners to their own broken dreams….

After a daring rescue goes awry, the parched north of India grows too hot for nurse Laine Harkness and her friend Eshana. The women flee to the tropical south…and run headlong into their respective pasts.

Laine takes a new nursing position at a plantation in the jungle, only to discover that her former fiancé is the owner…and that Adam has no more to say to her now than he did when he crushed her heart years ago. Why, then, is she still drawn to him, and to the tiger cub he is raising?

Eshana, captured by her traditional uncle and forced once more into the harsh Hindu customs of mourning, doubts whether freedom will ever again be in her future, much less the forbidden love that had begun to whisper to her. Is faith enough to live on? Or is her Savior calling her home?

Amid cyclones and epidemics, clashing faiths and consequences of the war, will the love of the True Master give hope to these searching hearts?

Watch the book trailer for Captured by Moonlight.

SHADOWED BY SILK by Christine Lindsay

She was invisible to those who should have loved her.

After the Great War, Abby Fraser returns to India, where her husband is stationed with the British army. She has longed to go home to the land of glittering palaces and veiled women . . . but Nick has become a cruel stranger and a cruel father to their three-year old son. It will take more than her American pluck to survive.

Major Geoff Richards, broken over the loss of so many of his men in the trenches of France, returns to his cavalry post in Amritsar. His faith does little to help him understand the ruthlessness of his British peers toward the Indian people he loves. Nor does it explain how he is to protect Abby Fraser and her child from the husband who mistreats them.

Amid political unrest, inhospitable deserts, and Russian spies, tensions rise in India as the people cry for the freedom espoused by Gandhi. Caught between their own ideals and duty, Geoff and Abby stumble into sinister secrets . . . secrets that will thrust them out of the shadows and straight into the fire of revolution.

Be sure to check out the Inner Source interview with the heroine, Laine Harkness, of Captured by Moonlight.

Be sure to meet Laine Harkness and Author Christine Lindsay.

 

Author Interview: Christine Lindsay

Christine Lindsay Author picToday’s guest is Christine Lindsay. Christine was born in Ireland, and is proud of the fact that she was once patted on the head by Prince Philip when she was a baby. Her great grandfather, and her grandfather—yes father and son—were both riveters on the building of the Titanic. Tongue in cheek, Christine states that as a family they accept no responsibility for the sinking of that great ship.

It was stories of her ancestors who served in the British Cavalry in Colonial India that inspired her multi-award-winning, historical series Twilight of the British Raj. Book 1 Shadowed in Silk, Book 2 Captured by Moonlight, and Christine is currently writing the final installment of that series called Veiled at Midnight to be released August 2014.

Londonderry Dreaming, Christine’s romance novella set in N. Ireland released in Feb. 2014.

Aside from being a busy writer and speaker, Christine is also VP of Christian Authors’ Network.

She makes her home in British Columbia, on the west coast of Canada with her husband and their grown up family. Her cat Scottie is chief editor on all Christine’s books. 

She makes her home in British Columbia, on the west coast of Canada with her husband and their grown up family. Her cat Scottie is chief editor on all Christine’s books.

Readers can connect with Christine by dropping by her website http://www.christinelindsay.com/ or follow her on Twitter and be her friend on Pinterest , Facebook  and  Goodreads.

Christine, thank you for being with us here this week to share with our readers the fascinating Inner Source of Captured by Moonlight. Please tell us about your novel. Where and when does it take place? Who are your main characters? What trouble do they get into?

Captured by Moonlight is the story of two friends—English nurse Laine Harkness, and Indian Christian, Eshana, who is a former Hindu widow. These two ladies are from the first book in my series, Twilight of the British Raj, but their adventures take them from the north of India to the tropical south during 1922.

Captured is the action verb of this novel. The story starts off with Eshana and Laine running away from the north of India because have been giving medical treatment to young girls in the sex trade. These young girls were basically slaves in a brothel hidden behind Hindu temples, an ancient Hindu tradition called devadasi. Not only are the Hindu priests and fanatics after them, but so is Eshana’s uncle. He has just discovered Eshana has been living like a Christian and not hidden away like a Hindu widow.

He attempts to kidnap Eshana, and this forces Laine and Eshana to escape away with the young girl they have rescued. But shortly afterward, Eshana truly is captured by her Hindu uncle. Unbeknownst to Laine, Eshana is imprisoned in the ruin of a palace in the tropical jungles of southern India.

Laine carries on to her new position as a nurse at a plantation in the same province. But Laine has her own feelings of being captive. For years she has continued to love the man who ended their engagement during The Great War. What a shock to find that the owner of the plantation she has come to work at is her former fiancé, Adam. Once again, Laine is captured by her feelings for him.

I love a book that has lots of adventure, history, but a big love story too.

While reading, I had to wonder if you were from or had ever been in India for a great length of time. I know that authors don’t always have to have firsthand knowledge of their locations, but you bring India so vividly into our imaginations, the question begs to be asked. Have you been to India, and if not, how did you bring it so vividly to the pages of Captured by Moonlight?

I was born in Great Britain, and as a child my parents immigrated to Canada, a British Commonwealth country. So I read more books set in British interests than those in American settings. As a young girl I devoured books written on British Colonial India, an era that many British people is as exciting as The Wild West is to Americans. Think swash-buckling cavalry heroes, and Englishwomen living in Indian bungalows serving cucumber sandwiches in flower-laden gardens.

After I wrote my first book in my series, Shadowed in Silk, I had the chance of a lifetime and traveled to India with a missions’ group. The places I visited are featured in the second novel of the series, Captured by Moonlight.

I was also fully engaged with the Hindu religion and how it is portrayed by both a woman who is not fully devoted to Christ, a woman who has been saved from the religion and the atrocities that they subjected women (especially widows) to, and by the complex way the people of India deal with the various religions. To your knowledge, do the Hindus still practice the temple worship, the shutting away of widows, and do they still operate under the caste system as they did in the early part of the 1900s?

The Hindus certainly do continue with their religion, and the caste system is integral to their beliefs. There are a lot of Indian people who are moderate in their beliefs today, but there are also a great many who are as vigilant as in the past.

I have visited the massive Hindu temples in the south of India and seen the various stone gods they worship. The shutting away of widows still goes on. So do the atrocities. With my own eyes I saw an elderly Hindu widow left to beg for her food on the stone floor of a temple. You can read about the continuing plight of widows in India in the news today. The caste system is still very much a part of Hindu life, even though Gandhi tried to soften its lines, for example by calling the Untouchables (Dalits) the Children of God and trying to improve the lot of widows.

Another interesting history that you presented was the cholera epidemics and how they killed so many because of the unsanitary conditions during that era. You describe the disease and the treatment by these nurses so well. Does India still suffer from these type of epidemics?

India is the place that cholera was born, and it’s also the country that has done a great deal of medical research on treatment. With medicines today, cholera is not as much of a killer as in years past, but it still happens. Medical missions still have to go into areas and set up treatment camps. In fact I based the physical setup of the cholera camp in my novel on that of modern day treatment centers.

Do you have any other projects that you’re working on? If so, please share those with us. I’m sure that readers who pick up Captured by Moonlight will want to read more from you.

I am currently finishing the third and final book to this series. The last book will be called Veiled at Midnight. Two children from Shadowed in Silk, who were still young in Captured by Moonlight feature as the main characters in the last book. Dassah is a beautiful Indian woman by now, and Cam is an English soldier just back from WW2.

Their love is torn asunder with the Partition of India. As Britain hands independence over to the Indian people, a new country (Pakistan) is carved out of India with a great deal of violence.

This volatile time, of great British pomp showing the Last Viceroy of India, Lord Louis Mountbatten is the setting of what I hope is a great love story.

About Captured by Moonlight 

CAPTURED BY MOONLIGHT—by Christine Lindsay Finalist in Readers’ Favorite 2013 Christian Historical, currently a finalist for the 2013 Grace Award and The Word Guild Award. (Best book 2013 according to Author April Gardner. Top ten of Diana Flowers 2013 picks.

Prisoners to their own broken dreams….

After a daring rescue goes awry, the parched north of India grows too hot for nurse Laine Harkness and her friend Eshana. The women Sarah  Lana as bookendsflee to the tropical south…and run headlong into their respective pasts.

Laine takes a new nursing position at a plantation in the jungle, only to discover that her former fiancé is the owner…and that Adam has no more to say to her now than he did when he crushed her heart years ago. Why, then, is she still drawn to him, and to the tiger cub he is raising?

Eshana, captured by her traditional uncle and forced once more into the harsh Hindu customs of mourning, doubts whether freedom will ever again be in her future, much less the forbidden love that had begun to whisper to her. Is faith enough to live on? Or is her Savior calling her home?

Amid cyclones and epidemics, clashing faiths and consequences of the war, will the love of the True Master give hope to these searching hearts?

Watch the book trailer for Captured by Moonlight.

About Shadowed in Silk:

She was invisible to those who should have loved her.

After the Great War, Abby Fraser returns to India, where her husband is stationed with the British army. She has longed to go home to the land of glittering palaces and veiled women . . . but Nick has become a cruel stranger and a cruel father to their three-year old son. It will take more than her American pluck to survive.

Major Geoff Richards, broken over the loss of so many of his men in the trenches of France, returns to his cavalry post in Amritsar. His faith does little to help him understand the ruthlessness of his British peers toward the Indian people he loves. Nor does it explain how he is to protect Abby Fraser and her child from the husband who mistreats them.

Amid political unrest, inhospitable deserts, and Russian spies, tensions rise in India as the people cry for the freedom espoused by Gandhi. Caught between their own ideals and duty, Geoff and Abby stumble into sinister secrets . . . secrets that will thrust them out of the shadows and straight into the fire of revolution.

Be sure to check out the Inner Source interview with the heroine, Laine Harkness, of Captured by Moonlight.

 

Character Interview: Laine Harkness from Captured by Moonlight

Sarah  Lana as bookendsToday’s guest is Laine Harkness, the hero from Christine Lindsay’s novel Captured by Moonlight

Laine, thank you for being with us today. I have to say, that I enjoyed your story tremendously. I felt as if I were in 1920s India with you. You have had a very interesting life. The era you live in, the area you live in, and the job you do are all fascinating. Would you mind telling our readers a little about yourself?

I’m proud to be a matron in the Queen Alexandra Imperial Military Nursing Corp serving in India. But then I was born in British Colonial India. The only time I lived in England was during the war. But we British in India seem to be more British—stiff upper lip and all that—than those who live in England. Strange, I agree.

I suppose one would call me a bit of a maverick. One doesn’t wish to brag, one should always do their bit, but it was quite the honor to receive the Royal Red Cross medal during The Great War for caring for soldiers for several days in a trench until help arrived.

Sadly, at the same time in my life, I received word that my fiancé had died. What a shock to find out he was not dead, but missing in action. I was overjoyed he was alive, but it quite stole the heart out of me when he promptly broke off our engagement.

Since then I’ve been filling my life caring for my patients, helping young Eshana give medical aid to poor Indian girls stuck in the sex trade, and then to have my life turned upside down again…gallivanting to the south of India because the Hindu population is out for our skin…only to discover the owner of the plantation clinic I’ve  just been hired for…is my former fiancé, Adam.

You guessed it—I’m as flabbergasted as a monkey with a stolen banana, to be sure.

Your story involves some missionary work to the different people groups of India, but especially to the Hindus. What is the most difficult part of your ministry?

If there’s one thing that frosts my morning mango, its cruelty to those less fortunate. When Eshana asked for my help in caring for young women caught in the Hindu sex trade I simply couldn’t say no. I love India…its exotic colors, spice in the air, glorious flora, the color of women’s saris…but I find the whole Hindu religion one of terrible cruelty. The way so many Hindu fanatics treat their widows is abominable—casting them out to beg on the streets for food.

And the way they treat the lowest of their castes—the Untouchables is quite beyond the pale.

You have a very special friend name Eshana. Her faith throughout the story, and the history that she has, is also very fascinating to me. Did seeing Eshana’s faith in action have an influence on your life in any way?

Eshana is—as we British put it—a brick. Wonderful young woman. I first met Eshana when Abby Fraser (of Shadowed in Silk) first came out to India, just after The Great War. Eshana used to be one of those mistreated Hindu widows, but she was rescued by an Indian Christian and soon became a Christian herself.

Watching Eshana in action as she emulates Christ has certainly made me pay attention. As a little girl I naturally went to church every Sunday, with my little white socks, pinafore, gloves and hat, but Eshana’s faith is so much more vibrant, more down to earth as she literally tries to be the hands and feet of her Lord.

It’s taken me a while—I’m a bit on the stubborn side—but I can’t ignore the Christ she is introducing me to. He’s not some distant, ambiguous being…is He?

Yours is a story of love lost. You thought you’d lost the man you love to war, and then he returns, but not to you. How do you recover from that type of rejection, or do you?

Losing Adam in the war ruined all other men for me. Good gracious, I’ve tried to pick up the pieces with other men, but each time I get close to them, and I hear the sound of wedding bells in their tone of voice, I’m afraid I flee for the hills. Here I am, at thirty, unmarried all because the one man I wanted to spend my life with has this atrocious secret.

It’s that which tears the heart and soul out of me. Why could he have not trusted me with whatever happened to him in the war? The only comfort I have found is in my work. Care for the sick and hurting.

It’s not enough for true happiness, but it will do.

Romans 8:28 says, “And we know that all things work together for good to them that love God, to them who are the called according to His purpose,” what good do you believe God brought to you through your journey, through Eshana’s journey, and because this question begs to be asked, what did the delay of the “good things” bring to your life when they finally arrived?

I suppose if all had gone well with my life…if Adam and I had married…and life had been as soft and gooey as peaches, I might not have paid God the time of day.

But being lonely, feeling the odd stick at a party because I’m a spinster, seeing the atrocities of what Indian women experience, and seeing Eshana’s faith up close, has brought me to a point in my life where I must seriously consider a relationship with this God who is reputed to have risen from the dead.

This is the crossroads my journey has brought me to. I may be a obstinate as a water buffalo at times, but trust me, I will make the right decision.

CAPTURED BY MOONLIGHT—by Christine Lindsay Finalist in Readers’ Favorite 2013 Christian Historical, currently a finalist for the 2013 Grace Award and The Word Guild Award. (Best book 2013 according to Author April Gardner. Top ten of Diana Flowers 2013 picks.

Prisoners to their own broken dreams….

After a daring rescue goes awry, the parched north of India grows too hot for nurse Laine Harkness and her friend Eshana. The women

flee to the tropical south…and run headlong into their respective pasts.

Laine takes a new nursing position at a plantation in the jungle, only to discover that her former fiancé is the owner…and that Adam has no more to say to her now than he did when he crushed her heart years ago. Why, then, is she still drawn to him, and to the tiger cub he is raising?

Eshana, captured by her traditional uncle and forced once more into the harsh Hindu customs of mourning, doubts whether freedom will ever again be in her future, much less the forbidden love that had begun to whisper to her. Is faith enough to live on? Or is her Savior calling her home?

Amid cyclones and epidemics, clashing faiths and consequences of the war, will the love of the True Master give hope to these searching hearts?

Watch the book trailer for Captured by Moonlight.

SHADOWED BY SILK by Christine Lindsay

She was invisible to those who should have loved her.

After the Great War, Abby Fraser returns to India, where her husband is stationed with the British army. She has longed to go home to the land of glittering palaces and veiled women . . . but Nick has become a cruel stranger and a cruel father to their three-year old son. It will take more than her American pluck to survive.

Major Geoff Richards, broken over the loss of so many of his men in the trenches of France, returns to his cavalry post in Amritsar. His faith does little to help him understand the ruthlessness of his British peers toward the Indian people he loves. Nor does it explain how he is to protect Abby Fraser and her child from the husband who mistreats them.

Amid political unrest, inhospitable deserts, and Russian spies, tensions rise in India as the people cry for the freedom espoused by Gandhi. Caught between their own ideals and duty, Geoff and Abby stumble into sinister secrets . . . secrets that will thrust them out of the shadows and straight into the fire of revolution.

Be sure to check out the Inner Source interview with the heroine, Laine Harkness, of Captured by Moonlight.

She was invisible to those who should have loved her.

After the Great War, Abby Fraser returns to India, where her husband is stationed with the British army. She has longed to go home to the land of glittering palaces and veiled women . . . but Nick has become a cruel stranger and a cruel father to their three-year old son. It will take more than her American pluck to survive.

Major Geoff Richards, broken over the loss of so many of his men in the trenches of France, returns to his cavalry post in Amritsar. His faith does little to help him understand the ruthlessness of his British peers toward the Indian people he loves. Nor does it explain how he is to protect Abby Fraser and her child from the husband who mistreats them.

Amid political unrest, inhospitable deserts, and Russian spies, tensions rise in India as the people cry for the freedom espoused by Gandhi. Caught between their own ideals and duty, Geoff and Abby stumble into sinister secrets . . . secrets that will thrust them out of the shadows and straight into the fire of revolution.

Be sure to check out the Inner Source interview with the heroine, Laine Harkness, of Captured by Moonlight.

Christine Lindsay Author picMore About the Author:

Christine Lindsay was born in Ireland, and is proud of the fact that she was once patted on the head by Prince Philip when she was a baby. Her great grandfather, and her grandfather—yes father and son—were both riveters on the building of the Titanic. Tongue in cheek, Christine states that as a family they accept no responsibility for the sinking of that great ship.

It was stories of her ancestors who served in the British Cavalry in Colonial India that inspired her multi-award-winning, historical series Twilight of the British Raj. Book 1 Shadowed in Silk, Book 2 Captured by Moonlight, and Christine is currently writing the final installment of that series called Veiled at Midnight to be released August 2014.

Londonderry Dreaming, Christine’s romance novella set in N. Ireland released in Feb. 2014.

Aside from being a busy writer and speaker, Christine is also VP of Christian Authors’ Network.

She makes her home in British Columbia, on the west coast of Canada with her husband and their grown up family. Her cat Scottie is chief editor on all Christine’s books. 

She makes her home in British Columbia, on the west coast of Canada with her husband and their grown up family. Her cat Scottie is chief editor on all Christine’s books.

Readers can connect with Christine by dropping by her website http://www.christinelindsay.com/ or follow her on Twitter and be her friend on Pinterest , Facebook  and  Goodreads.

 

Change and Acceptance by Jude Urbanski

judy_pic_2Change and Acceptance

 When I read the Autobiography in Five Short Chapters, written by Portia Nelson, I at first laughed, but, with reflection, realized a deep lesson was mine. To accomplish change, a different mindset is required. Different decisions and actions are required.

Accepting responsibility for our actions is among the hardest things to do. Once through blaming someone or something else, we finally see the light. May the length of the chapters it takes for you to make needed change and find acceptance be very short indeed, but may you take comfort in knowing the Heavenly One who never changes.

Every good and perfect gift is from above, coming down from the Father of the heavenly lights, who does not change like shifting shadows.

            James 1:17 NIV

  AUTOBIOGRAPHY IN FIVE SHORT CHAPTERS

by Portia Nelson

CHAPTER 1       I walk down the street.

                                 There is a deep hole in the sidewalk.

                                 I fall in.

                                 I am lost and I am hopeless.

                                 It is not my fault.

                                 It takes forever to find a way out.

CHAPTER 2     I walk down the same street.

                                There is a deep hole in the sidewalk.

                                I pretend I do not see it.

                                I fall in again.

                                I cannot believe I am in the same place.

                                It is not my fault.

                                It still takes a long time to get out.

CHAPTER 3    I walk down the same street.

                               There is a deep hole in the sidewalk.

                               I see it there.

                               I still fall in — it is a habit. 

                               My eyes are open.

                               I know where I am.

                               It is my fault.

                               I get out quickly.

CHAPTER 4  I walk down the same street.

                              There is a deep hole in the sidewalk.

                              I walk around it.

CHAPTER 5  I walk down a different street.

All the main characters in The Chronicles of Chanute Crossing come to realize they must walk down a different street to find change and healing within. It is only then we realize that yes, perhaps all things do work together for those who love the Lord and who are called according to His purpose.

Embrace change and acceptance!

About the Author, Jude Urbanski:

Jude Urbanski, pen name for Judy Martin-Urban, is a multi-published, award-winning author who writes women’s fiction with inspirational romance elements. She weaves stories about strong characters spinning tragedy into triumph with God’s help. She is published in fiction and nonfiction. Jude was a columnist for Maximum Living, a Gannett magazinefor five years. She is a member of ACFW and National League of American Pen Women.

Jude invites you to contact her via her websiteblogFacebook or Twitter! You can also find out about her other releases by visiting Desert Breeze Publishing.

JoyRestoredCoverArt72dpi_(1)About Joy Restored:

Waging War against God

Kate Davidson wears a mask since her husband’s life was snuffed out on a mountain curve. Outwardly, she continues to care for her children and home. Inwardly, she wages battle with God. Clayton may as well have died in the jungles of Vietnam as in a one-car accident on the Wolf River Bridge.

Living Life for God

Widower Seth Orbin well understands life and death in God. He wades through rain and lightning to rescue Kate and her kids from a mountain-top storm. The kids find great adventure in being stranded at Seth’s cabin, but the adults sidestep an unexpected attraction that fateful night.

Hard-won Faith

After sensing their wide spiritual gulf, Seth is conflicted by his growing love for Kate. He longs for her parched faith to heal, but she’s convinced he’s deluding himself with ideas of peace. Besides, Seth’s longtime girlfriend won’t exit the love triangle gracefully.

Will Kate refuse God’s healing and Seth’s love? Or will death steal Seth from her as well?

Be sure to meet, Jude’s heroine from Joy RestoredKate Davidson and her author.